Former Manhattan G.O.P. chairman buys townhouse

James Ortenzio (left) shakes hands with Arnold Schwarzenegger and
James Ortenzio (left) shakes hands with Arnold Schwarzenegger and 45 Horatio Street

James Ortenzio — the former Manhattan Republican party leader who pleaded guilty in 2007 to tax evasion — purchased a West Village townhouse property for $4.1 million, according to city records. The deal for the five-story building, which is located at 45 Horatio Street between Greenwich and Hudson streets, closed on Mar. 7.

A call to Ortenzio seeking confirmation and comment on his purchase was not immediately returned.

The 1899-built townhouse is configured as two units, according to its listing. The lower duplex with garden space has a life estate. The upper three levels of the building are leased to city brokerage Town Residential, per the listing.

In a statement, Town President and COO Jeff Appel told Luxury Lisings that the upper triplex was the brokerage’s first Village location, which originally housed over 25 representatives. They outgrew the space after two years and opened a new office nearly triple the size at 446 West 14th Street, as previously reported.

“45 Horatio was a great little office in a terrific location, and the tenant downstairs was always kind and friendly,” Appel said, “but we just simply outgrew it. When the lease expires in November, we have no plans to renew with the new owners.”

It was not immediately clear if Ortenzio will live at the building or use it as income property.

James Nelson of Massey Knakal had the listing. He did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

Ortenzio previously served as chairman of the Manhattan Republican organization. The charges against him stemmed from roughly $180,000 undisclosed income that he was paid in 2004 and 2005 as a consultant to a real estate company Fisher Brothers Management Co., and acting as arbitrator in a business spat over West Side helicopter services, according to previous reports. His guilty plea was part of a deal with prosecutors, which promised him five years of probation, according to previous articles on the matter. — Zachary Kussin

 

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