One co-op to sell: Soap star’s pied-a-terre trades hands

From left:
From left: Erika Slezak and images of her West 67th Street listing

Six-time Daytime Emmy award-winning actress Erika Slezak, who long portrayed Victoria Lord on “One Life to Live,” sold her Lincoln Square pied-a-terre for $1.73 million, Luxury Listings NYC has learned. The price paid for the two-bedroom, two-bathroom co-op marks the highest price ever reached in the building’s C line, according to one of the listing brokers.

The deal closed on Apr. 16; the transaction has not yet hit city records.

“It is a pleasure to have enjoyed a place so much and to know that it is going on to people who will enjoy it just as much,” Slezak told LLNYC in an email.

The home, located at 50 West 67th Street, served as Slezak’s relaxation den after exhausting days on the show’s set, which was once behind the building, then several blocks west. “It was a nice place to go home, have dinner, hang out and go to sleep,” she said late last year, when her home was featured in the January/February issue of LLNYC.

Slezak and Davies bought the apartment in March 2002; the price that they paid does not appear in city records. The couple’s primary home is located in New Canaan, Conn., and they stayed at the apartment four or five times each month when the show taped in the neighborhood. However, their trips to the city became less frequent following ABC’s cancellation of the show in 2012.

The spread hit the market for $1.83 million in early December, StreetEasy shows. It entered contract just four weeks later. Wendy Sarasohn and her daughter, Jamie Joseph, both of the Corcoran Group, had the listing.

Inside, there are 10-foot ceilings, a wood-burning fireplace, built-in bookcases and views over 67th Street. The apartment itself, like all others in the building, is soundproofed (the building was originally built as co-ops for musicians).

Michael and Sara Bernard are the buyers, according to city records. Both the buyers and sellers worked together to bring the deal to a quick close, Sarasohn said.

“It was like a love fest,” she said. “It was truly all goodwill.” — Zachary Kussin

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