Champagne tastes better at 39,000 feet

Flying first class just got a whole lot classier.

Singapore Airlines is now offering a champagne tasting (mostly Dom Perignon and Krug Grande Cuvèe) to their fanciest first class flyers. And this is just a pop and pour service.

The attendants on these flights have an extensive knowledge of food and wine, as many of them have passed a series of wine courses and may have even obtained a certificated from the Wine and Spirit Education Trust, according to Forbes.

The airline has been serving champagne for over 30 years, spending about $16 million annually on wine — and almost half of that budget is spent on champagne for business class flyers.

To get the full effect of these luxury wines, it is suggested to start the champagne tasting immediately after takeoff – when the seatbelt safety light has officially turned off. It takes about 20 minutes for each bottle to adjust to the altitude.

Next time you fly to Singapore, don’t overlook the option of champagne with your airplane scrambled eggs – it’ll be worth the extra calories.