Children are now invited to eat in Michelin-starred restaurants

Roast pork loin, rutabaga puree, red cabbage, apples! #dinner #Delandhud #Williamsburg #nyc

A photo posted by Delaware and Hudson (@delawareandhudson) on

If you resent your little child for preventing you from doing the things you love most in life– going out to clubs, partying all night, having a life that belongs entirely to you and, of course, eating in fancy restaurants — then a new startup may be exactly what you’re looking for.

Welcome to Nibble + squeak, a new dining club for mommies who are not, repeat NOT, giving up their Michelin-starred feasts for the sake of their toddlers. Mommy Melissa Elders started the club when she returned home from London and realized her 15-month-old daughter was seriously depriving her of three-star cuisine.  “In both New York City and London there are so many activities to do with kids,” the founder of Nibble + Squeak, Melissa Elders told New York Magazine. “I found that I was rushing between those events and barely managed to feed myself.”

The horror! In response, her club rents out delicious restaurants — the first was at Delaware and Hudson in Brooklyn and the second will be at ESH in Williamsburg — during lunch time and the ladies all go there to eat, drink (sometimes from sippy cups), change their kid’s diapers and enjoy themselves as the saintly waitstaff serves them and their crazy kids politely. They have also recently launched in London.

Of course, this being New York City — home of the obsessive parents — there are other goals too. According to NY Mag, some parents “hope to, at least in some way, help their wee ones on a road toward lifelong appreciation of thoughtful, ambitious cooking.”

After all, gifted and talented children must have a sophisticated palate if they are ever going to succeed in life.

  • Nibble+squeak

    Thanks for the feature, LLNYC! Hope to see you at an event soon:

  • bobk49

    The entire concept is vulgar with a capital V

    • Jencendiary

      I don’t know. Most of the rude fellow diners I’ve been exposed to have been adults. Maybe if they’d been taught to mind their table manners as children. . .