Artists are banding together to implore Ivanka to do something about her father

A photo posted by Ivanka Trump (@ivankatrump) on

Ivanka Trump’s pricey art collection is frequently highlighted on social media. According to Bloomberg, who have chronicled some of the more noteworthy pieces she has posted on Instagram, more than a dozen works are on view.

One featured prominently is a Dan Colen “chewing gum” painting; a comparable work sold for $578,500 at Phillips New York in 2012. Another is a “bullet hole” silkscreen by Nate Lowman; a similar painting in the same palette sold for $665,000 in 2013 at Sotheby’s in New York. Likewise, a third, taken from a Harper’s Bazaar shoot, shows a work by Alex Israel. A similar painting by Israel sold for $581,000 in 2014 at Phillips New York.

Cash aside, because of her father’s recent controversial presidential win, many artists who disagree with his proposed policies and attitude are not so eager to be aligned with the 35-year-old mother of three. Art dealer Bill Powers, who sold Ivanka an artwork by Louis Eisner in 2013 explained to Bloomberg, “I think there are a lot of artists that are uncomfortable now being incorporated, or leveraged, as part of the Ivanka Trump brand.”

Some have banded together to form Halt Action Group (HAG), a group founded of not just artists, but also dealers, psychoanalysts and collectors. HAG has recently created a campaign called “Dear Ivanka” which features an Instagram feed of stock images of the president-elect’s daughter along with pleas to her to address her father’s policies regarding global warming, universal healthcare and women’s issues. They seek to implore Ivanka “to answer for some of the hypocrisy she embodies” and to ultimately “thwart the normalization of what was unfolding in front of our eyes,” explained curator Alison Gingeras.

The artist Da Corte, decided to take a more direct approach, and commented on a photo Ivanka posted of herself in front of his painting, “Dear @Ivankatrump please get my work off of your walls. I am embarrassed to be seen with you.”

This crusade is certainly giving new meaning to the term “Art of the deal.” [Bloomberg]